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    While fears about traveling abroad may continue for months, international learning experiences are still vitally important, writes Mohamed Abdel-Kader, and institutions should develop more virtual exchange programs.

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    posted in COIL/VE + International Education read more
  • elvita_IIGE elvita_IIGE

    "...the rapid move to online learning during 2020 had real potential to reshape student mobility, collaboration and internationalisation of the curriculum and internationalisation at home.

    “But we also know digitalisation cannot solve issues of inclusion for disadvantaged groups and those living in rural communities and that the rapid shift to online teaching increases the need for mentoring, guidance and support to alleviate problems of health and well-being and issues linked to isolation.”

    https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=20201201100033975

    posted in COIL/VE + International Education read more
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    “The overall position for international education is… going to take a massive hit,” stated Marginson. “I think we are looking at least a five-year recovery period in terms of the numbers of people that move between countries for education.”

    posted in Strategic Discussions read more
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    Can traditional, campus-based universities adapt by choosing the right technologies and approaches for educating and engaging their students?
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    posted in General Discussion read more
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    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jls.21684

    "The novel coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID‐19 is one of the most unpredictable global public health crises in recent times. Academic leaders across the United States have responded by moving their educational and associated activities online; as a sense of immediacy swept the nation. The decision to pivot to remote learning was made swiftly, particularly by those institutions operating a shared leadership model, benefitting from a greater degree of agility, innovation, and collaboration. The current article highlights three of the leadership best practices for navigating unpredictable adaptive challenges such as that posed by the coronavirus pandemic. Firstly, by utilizing a type of servant leadership, that emphasizes empowerment, involvement, and collaboration, academic leaders with emotional intelligence and emotional stability should place the interests of others above their own. Secondly, academic leaders should distribute leadership responsibilities to a network of teams throughout the organization to improve the quality of the decisions made in crisis resolution and thirdly, leaders should communicate clearly and frequently to all stakeholders through a variety of communication channels. Looking forward, the rise of the flexible “allostatic leader” with the adaptive capacity to learn and evolve in crisis, to emerge better able to address future crises, is described. "

    posted in Strategic Discussions read more