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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    The New York Times
    By Frank Bruni

    Hundreds of thousands of undergraduates in America won’t be allowed on their campuses this fall, or the campuses welcoming them will be hollowed-out, locked-down, revelry-leeched shadows of their former selves. What kind of college experience is that?

    The kind that Natalie Kanter had by design. She did college without the campus — four demanding and exhilarating years of it. And I don’t mean that she lived off campus, commuting in as needed. There was no campus to commute to. No lecture halls. No rec center. No football stadium.
    Read more here.

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    There is great comfort in the familiar. It's one reason humans often flock to other people who share the same interests, laugh at the same jokes, hold the same political views. But familiar ground may not be the best place to cultivate creativity.
    Read the article here.

    posted in Cultural Connections read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Universities in England needing bailouts to survive the impact of Covid-19 will have to “demonstrate their commitment” to free speech as well as closing courses with low graduate pay, Gavin Williamson has announced.
    Read more here.

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    In summer 2018-19 Italian and French in Institution-wide Language Programme, piloted paired Oral exams. The impact of the change is explored below. Although discussed in the context of language assessment, the drivers for change, challenges and outcomes are relevant to any discipline intending to introduce more authentic and collaborative tasks in their assessment mix. Group assessments constitute around 4% of the University Assessment types (EMA data, academic year 2019-20).

    Can the "group assessment" model be applied to COIL courses?
    Read more here.

    posted in Strategic Discussions read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    With COVID-19 deaths alarmingly rising in various Iranian provinces, authorities have to face the dilemma of canceling nationwide university entrance examinations starting next week or risking the lives of more than a million participants.
    Read more here.

    posted in Regional Updates read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Bringing millions of students back to campus would create enormous risks for society but comparatively little educational benefit, an economist says.
    link text

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    On 25 May the Japanese government lifted its state of emergency, a month and a half after it was declared. The government’s soft or ‘halfway’ approach to ‘staying at home’ and ‘social distancing’ with no legal punishment had been frequently questioned. However, mainly as a result of citizens voluntarily obeying public health measures, the country has somehow managed to minimise the damage caused by the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    Akiyoshi Yonezawa link text

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Roughly one out of every four American workers are now unemployed, after jobless claims rose to more than 40 million this week. Typically, that results in a rush of people looking to higher education for new skills and credentials. But with such a sudden shift in the employment landscape, how can colleges best respond?link text

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Most experts predict we will not have a vaccine for COVID-19 until mid-2021, more than a year from now. In the meantime, the American higher education community is going to be turned upside down, and the educational effects will last long after the virus has been brought under control. What will the impact be? Here are ten predictions. Summary: disruption will finally arrive. link text

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Fewer students from abroad expected to study in the U.S. link text

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