• Sajjad Sajjad

    David R. Harris shares three lessons his campus has already learned as students have returned for the new term amid some of the worst days of the pandemic. Read more here.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    As we celebrate the 30th anniversary of the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Their Families and near the end of an exceptional year marked by the Covid-19 pandemic, Education International calls on governments to protect and respect the human rights of all migrants, including children, young people, teachers, and education support personnel.

    Continue reading here.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Read Alex Usher's take on the issue here.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Several countries in Asia are closing universities or starting university vacations early as a second wave of COVID-19 spreads in the region. This week the governments of Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran announced the closure of universities and schools. Elsewhere, plans are being drawn up to close universities early for the winter break.
    Read more here.

    posted in Regional Updates read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    The German government has announced a massive €4 billion (US$4.8 billion) budget to support research projects addressing global warming and sustainability under its FONA strategy over the coming five years.
    Read the article here by Michael Gardner.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Much of the focus regarding the impact of COVID-19 on higher education globally has been on the future viability of the present model of the university. The nature of teaching, learning, research and the student experience is open to question. This should also, however, be a moment for equity.
    Read more here.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    In a special statement on COVID-19 issued on 11 November, the parties to the Tokyo Convention on the recognition of qualifications in the Asia-Pacific have called for “fair and transparent recognition” of studies and qualifications, including a push to recognise qualifications “obtained through non-traditional learning and partial studies” in order to avoid further disruption to education and student mobility.
    Read more here.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Enrollment and tuition fee data reinforce our anecdotal sense that students seeking community college credentials face the biggest problems, Sandy Baum writes.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    The New York Times
    By Frank Bruni

    Hundreds of thousands of undergraduates in America won’t be allowed on their campuses this fall, or the campuses welcoming them will be hollowed-out, locked-down, revelry-leeched shadows of their former selves. What kind of college experience is that?

    The kind that Natalie Kanter had by design. She did college without the campus — four demanding and exhilarating years of it. And I don’t mean that she lived off campus, commuting in as needed. There was no campus to commute to. No lecture halls. No rec center. No football stadium.
    Read more here.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    There is great comfort in the familiar. It's one reason humans often flock to other people who share the same interests, laugh at the same jokes, hold the same political views. But familiar ground may not be the best place to cultivate creativity.
    Read the article here.

    posted in Cultural Connections read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Universities in England needing bailouts to survive the impact of Covid-19 will have to “demonstrate their commitment” to free speech as well as closing courses with low graduate pay, Gavin Williamson has announced.
    Read more here.

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    In summer 2018-19 Italian and French in Institution-wide Language Programme, piloted paired Oral exams. The impact of the change is explored below. Although discussed in the context of language assessment, the drivers for change, challenges and outcomes are relevant to any discipline intending to introduce more authentic and collaborative tasks in their assessment mix. Group assessments constitute around 4% of the University Assessment types (EMA data, academic year 2019-20).

    Can the "group assessment" model be applied to COIL courses?
    Read more here.

    posted in Strategic Discussions read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    With COVID-19 deaths alarmingly rising in various Iranian provinces, authorities have to face the dilemma of canceling nationwide university entrance examinations starting next week or risking the lives of more than a million participants.
    Read more here.

    posted in Regional Updates read more
  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Bringing millions of students back to campus would create enormous risks for society but comparatively little educational benefit, an economist says.
    link text

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    On 25 May the Japanese government lifted its state of emergency, a month and a half after it was declared. The government’s soft or ‘halfway’ approach to ‘staying at home’ and ‘social distancing’ with no legal punishment had been frequently questioned. However, mainly as a result of citizens voluntarily obeying public health measures, the country has somehow managed to minimise the damage caused by the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    Akiyoshi Yonezawa link text

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Roughly one out of every four American workers are now unemployed, after jobless claims rose to more than 40 million this week. Typically, that results in a rush of people looking to higher education for new skills and credentials. But with such a sudden shift in the employment landscape, how can colleges best respond?link text

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Most experts predict we will not have a vaccine for COVID-19 until mid-2021, more than a year from now. In the meantime, the American higher education community is going to be turned upside down, and the educational effects will last long after the virus has been brought under control. What will the impact be? Here are ten predictions. Summary: disruption will finally arrive. link text

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Fewer students from abroad expected to study in the U.S. link text

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    Through numerous conversations with chief learning and human resource officers from companies around the globe, it has become quite clear that corporate education and training will never return to the in-person classroom. link text

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  • Sajjad Sajjad

    How does the current corona-virus pandemic affect people across the world? This website aims to be a repository of documentation evidencing the experience of COVID-19, with a particular focus on the role of digital technologies in responding to the crisis. It is sourced from students, researchers, healthcare workers, and indeed anyone who wishes to participate.

    This resource can be used by anyone wishing to understand how people are using and re-purposing social media, digital data and digital infrastructures, to respond to the rupture and re-organisation of everyday life during the current pandemic.
    link text

    posted in Research/Pubs read more